Conference Location: 

Waco Convention Center

100 Washington Avenue

Waco, TX  76701

APA-Texas Website:

www.txplanning.org

APATX19 Pre-Conference Workshops

Plan to arrive early at APATX19 and attend one of these our featured Pre-Conference Workshops. Most workshops are free with your full registration, but do require you to reserve your seat as space will be limited. 

A Special Featured Workshop, featuring Randall Arendt, will occur on Friday afternoon following the Awards Luncheon and does require advanced ticket purchase. 

This session is an overview of what to expect when taking the AICP certification exam. Learn helpful study tips and test-taking strategies for the exam, review major topic areas covered, and identify important study aids and resources.

Trainer: Dr. Jennifer Evans-Cowley, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at the University of North Texas

WT1 - AICP EXAM PREP WORKSHOP

Wednesday, November 6

12:30-6:30pm

TICKET REQUIRED - $60                           

ticket-1-icon.png

$60 Purchase Ticket

(Not Included with Registration)

 
 

From the mountains in West Texas to the waters of the Gulf of Mexico, communities along the U.S. – Mexico border are rich in history, cultural diversity, and contribute significantly to economic output of Texas and the U.S. Communities along the border have been among the safest in Texas and the U.S. for decades, yet are often cast in a negative image within Federal and State legislative and policy discussion. This session will discuss how border communities have developed unique solutions to address transportation, public health, and environment protection. In addition, the panel will discuss how government agencies and non-profit organizations are working collaboratively to promote protection of vulnerable populations and environmental conservation within the context of border security.

Speakers: 

  • Fred Lopez, AICP CTP, CNU-A, Director of Urban Planning, Creosote Collaborative, LLC in El Paso

  • Juli Rankin, FAICP, Former Planning Director, City of McAllen

  • Constanza Miner, Planning and Development Services Director, City of Brownsville

  • Sonia Najera, Grasslands Program Manager, The Nature Conservancy

WT3: Planning in Communities along the U.S. – Mexico Border: Successes, Opportunities and Challenges

Wednesday, November 6

1:00-3:00pm                               

Reserve Your Seat
Space is Limited

Free with Full, Short Course, Student or Wednesday Only Registration

The 6th Annual Leadership Forum will be an interactive workshop facilitated by leadership and executive coaching expert Jay Mathis of Mathis Training & Development, LLC.

 

Every generation is searching for leaders in the workplace who go beyond minimum expectations in an effort to transform the culture around them. Jay Mathis will challenge participants to be catalytic leaders who create vibrant organizations and communities that are known for performance excellence, relational integrity and vibrant growth.  Join us for this dynamic, interactive 2-hour session. 

Speakers

  • Doug McDonald, AICP, APATX President

  • Monica Rainey, APATX Emerging Planning Leaders Chair

  • Jay Mathis, Leadership Development Speaker

WT5: Transformational Leadership 
APATX 6th Annual Leadership Forum

Wednesday, November 6

1:00-3:00pm

Reserve Your Seat
Space is Limited

Free with Full, Short Course, Student or Wednesday Only Registration

Many people in government, including planners, perceive the news media as adversaries. It doesn’t have to be this way. In this eye-opening session, a former veteran broadcast journalist-turned government communicator explains how you can work with the media to tell your planning-related stories and positive messaging to your communities. Join us for this interactive workshop where planners will gain inside knowledge of media expectations - and learn how planners can become effective communicators. 

Speaker: Steve Stoler, Director of Media Relations at City of Plano and former television news reporter

WT6: Why Can’t We Be Friends? – Hey Planners, the Media is not Your Enemy!
THIS SESSION HAS BEEN CANCELLED 

Wednesday, November 6

1:00-3:00pm                       

Reserve Your Seat
Space is Limited

Free with Full, Short Course, Student or Wednesday Only Registration

Stories surround us. They help us understand the world and our place in it. They are also critical for influence, persuasion and advocacy. Studies show that stories shape opinions, aid in recall, and are vital for communicating the unique value and distinctive role of planning in making great communities for all. Stories help targeted audiences understand complex issues in a new way that can reframe and reshape how people see planning. Advancing legislative and policy changes for good planning increasingly requires good storytelling skills.

 

Today’s political climate makes collecting, crafting, and communicating stories more important than ever. Planners can be the chief storytellers for their communities helping community members and elected officials understand change, find a vision for the future, and advance the policy changes needed to achieve that vision.

 

This workshop will discuss communications lessons and strategies from the world of marketing, communications, and political campaigns that can help planners succeed as storytellers. Discover how stories work and how to spot and craft persuasive advocacy stories. APA policy and communications staff will detail the role of storytelling in influencing opinion and framing critical policy debates. This engaging and interactive workshop format will help you find, hone, and present persuasive stories that can influence key leaders and decision-makers. 

Speakers:

  • Jason Jordan, Director of Policy for the American Planning Association 

  • Liz Lang, Director of Marketing for the American Planning Association

WT2: Storytelling for Advocacy

Wednesday, November 6

3:30-5:30pm                               

Reserve Your Seat
Space is Limited

Free with Full, Short Course, Student or Wednesday Only Registration

In June 2019, APA released the Planning for Equity Policy Guide, which includes policies and actions that can be used to create equitable communities. Topics addressed by the guide include gentrification, environmental justice, community engagement and empowerment, climate change, education, energy and energy resource consumption, health equity, housing, mobility and transportation, public spaces and places, and heritage preservation. This session will provide an overview of the policy guide, including a discussion of the role planning has played in the past regarding equity and the actions planners and practitioners can take in the future to achieve more equitable communities. This will be followed by an interactive worksession by asking participants to consider potential development or redevelopment scenarios and apply policies and principles of equity to achieve equitable outcomes.  

Speaker: Susan A. Wood, AICP,  Planning for Equity Policy Guide, Co-Chair; Planning Project Manager for the Denver Regional Transportion District

WT4: Planning Policies and Actions to Advance Equity: Implementing the Planning for Equity Policy Guide

Wednesday, November 6

3:30-5:30pm                                 

Reserve Your Seat
Space is Limited

Free with Full, Short Course, Student or Wednesday Only Registration

Since 2013, several members of APA’s Sustainable Communities Division (SCD) have been discussing setting up a technical working committee to advance the discussion of sustainability and resilience in Texas. National-, state-, and local-based issues – from a changing climate to frequent flooding and other man-made/natural disasters, to unsustainable land development and changing fiscal realities – our Texas communities are in dire need of reframing our priorities and defining a long-term action plan for a sustainable and resilient future. As planners, we are uniquely trained and positioned to lead this discussion. This workshop is intended to be an interactive, introductory working group to better define Texas’ response to these important issues and steps for moving forward.

 

General topics include:

  • Defining Texas’ approach to climate change.

  • Defining how Texas planners can advance the sustainability / resilience discussion in their communities.

  • Defining the need and outline for an updated sustainability / resilience chapter in the Guide to Urban Planning for Texas Communities.

  • Defining an APA-Texas Sustainability/Resilience Working Group to partner with the SCD and other divisions to advance sustainability / resilience planning issues in Texas. 

Speakers:

  • Matt Bucchin, AICP, APA Sustainable Communities Division Chair and Team Leader/ Director of Planning Halff Associates

  • Aaron Tuley, Team Leader, Planning and Landscape Architecture Halff Associates

  • Kimberley Miller, AICP, APATX Harvey Recovery Committee Chair and Senior Planner Halff Associates

  • Tamara Cook, Senior Program Manager of Environment & Development at the North Central Texas Council of Governments

WT7: APA Sustainable Communities Division Workshop

Wednesday, November 6

3:30-5:30pm                              

Reserve Your Seat
Space is Limited

Free with Full, Short Course, Student or Wednesday Only Registration

 
 
 
 
 

APATX19 Special Featured Session

APA Small Town and Rural Planning Division Session

Arendt_headshot.jpg

In recent years, many communities disappointed with the results of conventional zoning – which has often produced ugly strip malls along highway corridors and inappropriate single-story redevelopment in town centers – have turned to new approaches to better control the appearance of new buildings. Unlike typical zoning, these approaches provide criteria and standards governing the physical shape and placement of proposed construction.

Form-based coding (FBCs) is one approach that primarily regulates land uses and their density/intensity, shifting the emphasis to controls on building size and placement. However, Peter Katz, founding executive director of the CNU and cofounder of the Form Based Codes Institute, has expressed concern that FBCs may face difficulties in achieving the wide acceptance that he and fellow advocates seek. 

 

A new approach that has emerged is even simpler and shorter, employing design standards that are added to existing zoning or “site plan review” ordinances, typically for downtowns and highway corridor areas. Another big advantage is that they can often be created in-house by staff at bare-bones cost or with minimal consultant time. This approach, called “form-based design standards” (FBDS) can be a good choice for smaller communities with populations under 15-20,000. For example, Davidson NC (population 12,400) and Freeport, ME (population 8,400) have achieved extremely impressive results over the past 20 years with form-based design standards, employed in conjunction with existing or updated zoning ordinances. In both cases (and also in Durango CO, Oxford OH, and Sudbury MA -- with populations between 18,000 and 22,000), officials and staff closely examined FBCs and concluded that the FBDS approach would meet their needs very well in a far simpler and less expensive way. The regulations that these municipalities have adopted could provide useful models for other communities with limited financial or staff resources.

Attend this APATX19 Special Featured Session to learn more about the elements and applicability of Form-Based Design Standards, and how this new approach could be applied in your community. 

Speaker: Randall Arendt, FRTPI, ASLA (Hon.)

WT8: Form-Based Design Standards for

Smaller Communities

Friday, November 8

2:00-3:30pm

TICKET REQUIRED - $15                          

ticket-1-icon.png

$15 Purchase Ticket

(Not Included with Registration)

Space is Limited